Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print

Garden Workbench

Roberto Gonzalez

DURING THE WEEK, Michael Bragg works for CNL Financial Group in a sleek office tower downtown. In his off hours, though, the College Park resident is a garden guru, getting his hands dirty while working at his backyard workbench. He built it himself using a couple of salvaged wooden pallets and some two-by-fours. “I came across the idea on Pinterest and thought, ‘Hey I can do that!’ ” He uses the workbench to re-pot plants, prune and care for his orchids—even to saw and paint pieces of lumber. “It’s a very handy work surface.”  

Instead of building shelves, Bragg utilized the open slats on the back of the pallet to strategically place several large “s” hooks so he could hang small potted orchids—his favorite plants—and gardening tools. “This way I can reposition items if I need to.  If I had installed two or three shelves across the back, it wouldn’t have given me the flexibility that the ‘s’ hooks do.”

Gardening has been his passion since childhood. “I can’t think of anything I haven’t been able to grow. I even look for plants in nurseries that are past

the flowering stage or look a little sad because I can find the best deals. Once they get a little TLC, they bounce right back.”

Bragg also likes to repurpose old or used items by making them into something “new” and useful. In addition to his workbench, he’s built a tree swing, as well as a garden bench out of used steppingstones and pavers. For his next garden project, Bragg is on to bigger things: “I want to build a pergola or shade structure for my passionflower vine to grow through.”

Add your comment:

 

Advertisement